The Chenrezig Fund



 

The Chenrezig Fund

The Chenrezig Fund was founded in 1998 and grated 501(c)(3) status in 2000. The founding board members have been involved for several years in raising funds for Tibetan social service and education projects. The Chenrezig Fund is staffed entirely by volunteers. Its modest operating expenses are funded by the earnings on the Chenrezig Fund bank account.  Therefore, no administrative overhead is deducted from contributions towards specific projects. 100% of all contributions towards these projects are sent to directly benefit the Tibetans served by those projects. AAs a 501(c(3) charitable corporation, all donations made to the Chenrezig Fund are tax deductible to the extend allowed by law. Members of the Board regularly site visit all projects supported by the Chenrezig Fund. The Chenrezig Fund financial records are open for public inspection.

Origin of the Fund's Name

Chenrezig is the bodhisattva who embodies universal compassion. The literal meaning of Chenrezig is Looking with Clear Eyes. He is considered as the patron and protector of the Land of Snow, and important events and personalities of Tibetan Buddhism are regarded as connected with his action. His mantra (om mani peme hung) was the first one introduced in Tibet and is most widespread there. Legend sees in him the founding father of the Tibetan people and H.H. the Dalai Lama is venerated as an incarnation of Chenrezig. His limitless compassion expresses itself in his wonderful ability to help all beings in times of extreme danger. In folk belief, Chenrezig also protects from natural catastrophe and grants blessings to children. His female counterpart is the Bodhisattva goddess Tara, The Liberator. In one of the most important iconographical forms, Chenrezig is represented standing with a thousand arms, a thousand eyes, and eleven faces. The numerous arms symbolize his ability to work for the welfare of sentient beings in a manner corresponding to any situation.

(Abstracted from: Fischer-Schreiber, I, Ehrhard, FK, and Diener, MS. The Shambhala Dictionary of Buddhism and Zen, Shambalha Publications, Boston, 1991; and Thurman, RAF. Inside Tibetan Buddhism, Collins Publishers, San Francisco, 1995.)